November 2014

The following table lists the speed limits for various types of roads in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. If a state has different speed limits for commercial trucks, they are listed separately.

In many states, the maximum speed limit that state or local authorities can establish depends on whether the road is a rural or urban interstate, a noninterstate limited-access highway, or another type of road. Limited-access highways are multiple-lane roads with restricted access via exit and entrance ramps, rather than intersections. The limited-access highways that make up the national interstate highway system are divided into urban and rural sections, based on population density figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. The designations may be adjusted by state and local governments to reflect planning and other issues.

Speed limits have traditionally been the responsibility of the states. In the mid-1970s, however, Congress established a national maximum speed limit by withholding highway funds from states that maintained speed limits greater than 55 mph. The requirement was loosened for rural interstates in 1987 and completely repealed in 1995. As of today, 38 states have speed limits of 70 mph or higher on some portion of their roadway systems.

State Rural interstates
(mph)
Urban interstates
(mph)
Other limited access roads
(mph)
Other roads
(mph)
Alabama 70
65
65
65
Alaska 65
55
65
55
Arizona 75
65
65
65
trucks: 65
Arkansas 70;
trucks: 65
651
651
651
California 70;
trucks: 55
65
trucks: 55
70
trucks: 55
65
trucks: 55
Colorado 75
65
65
65
Connecticut 65
55
65
55
Delaware 65
55
65
55
District of Columbia n/a
55
n/a
25
Florida 70
65
70
65
Georgia 70
70
65
65
Hawaii 602
602
552
452
Idaho 75; 80 on specified segments of road3
trucks: 70
75; 80 on specified segments of road3
trucks: 65
70
70
Illinois 704
55
65
55
Indiana 70;
trucks: 65
55
60
55
Iowa 70
55
70
65
Kansas 75
75
75
65
Kentucky 65; 70 on specified segments of road5
65
65
55
Louisiana 75
70
70
65
Maine 75
75
75
60
Maryland 65
65
65
55
Massachusetts 65
65
65
55
Michigan 70 (trucks 60); <70 (trucks 55)
65
70
55
Minnesota 70
65
65
55
Mississippi 70
70
70
65
Missouri 70
60
70
65
Montana 75;
trucks: 65
65
day: 70; night: 65
day: 70; night: 65
Nebraska 75
65
65
60
Nevada 75
65
70
70
New Hampshire 65; 70 on specified segments of road6
65
55
55
New Jersey 65
55
65
55
New Mexico 75
75
65
55
New York 65
65
65
55
North Carolina 70
70
70
55
North Dakota 75
75
70
65
Ohio 70
65
70
55
Oklahoma 75
70
70
70
Oregon 65;
trucks: 55
55
55
55
Pennsylvania 70
70
70
55
Rhode Island 65
55
55
55
South Carolina 70
70
60
55
South Dakota 75
75
70
70
Tennessee 70
70
70
65
Texas 75; 80 or 85 on specified segment of road7
75
75
75
Utah 75; 80 on specified segments of road8
65
75
65
Vermont 65
55
50
50
Virginia 70
70
65
55
Washington 70;
trucks: 60
60
60
60
West Virginia 70
55
65
55
Wisconsin 65
65
65
55
Wyoming 75; 80 on specified segments of road9
75; 80 on specified segments of road9
65
65

1In Arkansas, the speed limit may be raised on particular two-lane or four-lane highways to 65 mph if based on traffic and engineering studies.

2In Hawaii, the maximum speed limit is established by county ordinance or by the director of transportation.

3In Idaho, the speed limit may be increased to 80 mph on specific segments of highway on the basis of an engineering and traffic investigation.

4The Illinois law allows Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, Madison, McHenry, St. Clair and Will Counties to opt-out by adopting an ordinance that sets a lower maximum speed limit, empowering counties to make adjustments based on their own local needs.

5In Kentucky, the speed limit may be increased to 70 mph on specific segments of highway on the basis of an engineering and traffic investigation.

62013 New Hampshire House Bill 146 raised the speed limit from 65 to 70 mph on the portion of I-93 from mile marker 45 to the Vermont border.

7Sections of I-10 and I-20 in West Texas and sections of Highway 45 in Travis County have a speed limit for passenger cars and light trucks of 80 mph. Speed limits of up to 85 mph may be established if the highway is originally constructed and designed to accommodate the higher speed and it has been determined by an engineering study to be reasonable and safe. State Highway 130 (portions toll) has a posted limit of 85 mph, effective Oct. 2012.

8In Utah, the speed limit may be increased beyond 75 mph on any freeway or limited access highway on the basis of an engineering and traffic investigation, effective May 12, 2014. The highest posted limit in Utah is currently 80mph.

9In Wyoming, the speed limit may be increased to 80 mph on specific segments of highway on the basis of an engineering and traffic investigation.